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Bone Marrow Holds Secrets for Treating Colitis and Crohn's

Michigan State University researchers have unlocked secrets in bone marrow that could lead to improved treatments for colitis and Crohn's disease.

 

The results, featured in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences, show that the havoc inflammatory bowel diseases wreaks on the digestive tract is mirrored in bone marrow. Early indications also show that the disorders of the gut could potentially be treated through the bone marrow, said Pam Fraker, MSU University Distinguished Professor of biochemistry and molecular biology.

"It's possible that if we could reduce bone marrow's ability to produce inflammatory cells that we could reduce the severity of colitis and Crohn's disease," said Fraker, who co-authored the study with MSU colleagues Laura McCabe, professor of physiology and radiology, and Mark Trottier, research specialist. "This could limit the damage that the disease causes and reduce the number of patients needing surgery."

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