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Can Calamari Oil DHA Help In Lowering The Risk Of Cancer?

Foods containing omega-3 fatty acids can help in lowering the risk and prevention of certain cancers

 

According to studies, the essential fatty acid DHA which is found in cold water fish, krill and squid can help in minimizing the development of skin and oral cancers. A study was made by scientists from The University of London who cultured cells in the laboratory from several cell lines. The cell lines include malignant oral and skin cancers alongside pre malignant cells and normal oral sand skin cells. The goal of the study is to focus on  a type of cancer called the squamous-cell carcinoma. This cancer cell is known as one of the major forms of skin cancer that manifests and affect the outer layers of the human skin. The researchers stated that the squamous-cell carcinoma can also manifest in the digestive linings, lungs and can also spread to the other body areas.

Selumetinib - Breakthrough in Ovarian Cancer

Researchers at The University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix have discovered that many women with low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary

 

or peritoneum have seen their tumors stabilize or shrink after taking a regular dose of the compound selumetinib.

The findings, published in the Feb. 14 edition of The Lancet Oncology, show that selumetinib targets a mutation in the MAPK pathway for patients with low-grade serous carcinoma, allowing for treatment on previously chemoresistant tumors.

"This is a potentially important breakthrough for the Gynecologic Oncology Group," said John Farley, MD, a gynecologic oncologist in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, a Dignity Health Member.

The Gynecologic Oncology Group is a non-profit international organization with the purpose of promoting excellence in the quality and integrity of clinical and basic scientific research in the field of gynecologic malignancies.

Dr. Farley is part of the University of Arizona Cancer Center at St. Joseph's and is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology with a subspecialty certification in gynecologic oncology. He is a retired decorated Army colonel who completed a residency in obstetrics and gynecology and a fellowship in gynecologic oncology at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He is the first author on this study.

More gene links to breast cancer risk

The well-known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations linked to breast cancer are rare and have a strong effect on cancer risk

 

But since these mutations only contribute to a small percentage of breast cancers, much of the genetic risk is thought to come from common gene variants with weaker effects.

To identify these, Jeffrey Smith, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Medicine, William Dupont, Ph.D., professor of Biostatistics, and colleagues searched for single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs – single “letter” changes in the genetic code – associated with breast cancer in four independent breast cancer study populations.

Obesity Promotes Tumor Growth Regardless of Diet

Researchers may have discovered a new explanation as to why obese patients with cancer often have a poorer prognosis compared with those who are lean

 

The potential explanation is based on data reported in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Studies of the population have clearly established that there is a link between obesity and cancer incidence," said Mikhail Kolonin, Ph.D., associate professor at the Institute of Molecular Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Moreover, for several cancers, obesity is associated with a poorer prognosis."

Kolonin and his colleagues evaluated how obesity promotes cancer progression. "Our earlier studies led us to hypothesize that fat tissue called white adipose tissue, which is the fat tissue that expands in individuals who are obese, is itself directly involved and that it is not just diet and lifestyle that are important," he said.

Guidelines for the Screening and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

New potential tools

 

Julio M. Pow-Sang, M.D., chair of Moffitt Cancer Center's Department of Genitourinary Oncology, and colleagues have published two prostate cancer articles in the September issue of JNCCN -- The Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. The articles review and clarify recent updates made to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network's (NCCN) guidelines for the screening and treatment of prostate cancer.

According to the NCCN, nearly 242,000 cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in 2012, accounting for 29 percent of new cancers among men. It is estimated that more than 28,000 men will die from the disease this year.

According to the journal, prostate cancer is "over diagnosed and over treated" and is subject to a controversy "fueled by large screening studies." This month, Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, the NCCN has offered support for active surveillance, a strategy by which men with low-risk tumors, often classified as clinically insignificant, are monitored over time.

‘Clonal’ evolution in patient’s Maxillary Sinus Carcinoma

Examination of sinus cavity tumor provides potential roadmap for rare cancer treatments

 

Knowing how tumors evolve can lead to new treatments that could help prevent cancer from recurring, according to a study published today by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Scottsdale Healthcare.

TGen researchers tracked several years of tumor evolution in a 47-year-old male patient with maxillary sinus carcinoma (MSC), a rare cancer of the sinus cavities beneath the cheeks that often requires surgical removal that is disfiguring. Fewer than half of MSC patients live more than 5 years after diagnosis.

“The ability to characterize clonal evolution of this rare cancer and identify its Achilles’ heel can significantly impact treatment, leading to more personalized medicine,” according to the study published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

No Link found Between Working the Night Shift and an Increased Risk of Cancer

The final results showed no relationship between shift work and an increased risk of developing prostate, colon or breast cancers or nearly any other kind of cancer, regardless of how much the occupation depended upon shift work

 

COLUMBUS , Ohio – Working the night shift doesn't appear to increase the risk of developing cancer, suggests the findings of a new study of Swedish workers.

Recent studies – and corresponding news headlines – have found that regularly working the night shift may increase the risk of developing breast, prostate and colon cancers. Some researchers say that the connection could be due to a decrease in the production of the hormone melatonin, as some animal experiments suggest that the hormone may have anti-cancer properties.

Our bodies produce their highest levels of melatonin at night, during sleep, but exposure to light at night suppresses melatonin production, said Judith Schwartzbaum, the study's lead author and an associate professor of epidemiology at Ohio State University.

Offspring of childhood cancer survivors have no increased risk for birth defects

A large, retrospective study of the children of childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation therapy and/or some forms of chemotherapy found that the offspring do not have an increased risk for birth defects compared to children of cancer survivors who did not receive such treatments.

 

The findings provide reassurance that increased risks of birth defects are unlikely for the children of childhood cancers survivors and can help guide family planning choices for those survivors.

The study was published online today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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