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New Otago study focuses on health aspects of toxic site clean-up

University of Otago researchers have received a Health Research Council of New Zealand and Ministry of Health partnership research grant to conduct an epidemiological study of the former Fruitgrowers Chemical Company site in Mapua

 

The project will be conducted over a two-year period and will be the first multidisciplinary exploration of health outcomes associated with soil remediation at a chemically contaminated site in New Zealand.

The Mapua site was classified as a highly contaminated site and soil remediation began in 2004 and was completed in 2008. There have been local health concerns raised about chemical exposure during the remediation work.

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The Prevention of Lifestyle Diseases Has Finally Reached the Top Table of the United Nations

Today, the General Assembly begins a two-day summit with heads of government on non-communicable diseases, the first health issue on the UN agenda since HIV/AIDS in 2001

 

The European Society of Cardiology, through the European Chronic Disease Alliance (ECDA), has urged European heads of state "to show leadership" and long-term commitment to the prevention of chronic non-communicable diseases at today's "high level meeting" of the UN General Assembly in New York.1

This will be the first time ever that the UN has sought "action-orientated" commitments from governments and international organisations on the prevention and control of lifestyle-related diseases, and only the second time - following its declaration on HIV/AIDS in 2001 - that a health issue has attracted such high governmental attention. Measures to prevent non-communicable diseases, says the UN, have the potential to save "millions of lives" and "untold suffering".

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Coconut Oil Could Combat Tooth Decay

Digested coconut oil is able to attack the bacteria that cause tooth decay

 

It is a natural antibiotic that could be incorporated into commercial dental care products, say scientists presenting their work at the Society for General Microbiology's Autumn Conference at the University of Warwick.

The team from the Athlone Institute of Technology in Ireland tested the antibacterial action of coconut oil in its natural state and coconut oil that had been treated with enzymes, in a process similar to digestion. The oils were tested against strains of Streptococcus bacteria which are common inhabitants of the mouth. They found that enzyme-modified coconut oil strongly inhibited the growth of most strains of Streptococcus bacteria including Streptococcus mutans -- an acid-producing bacterium that is a major cause of tooth decay.

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