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Scientists Find Stem Cells That Tell Hair It's Time to Grow

Yale researchers have discovered the source of signals that trigger hair growth, an insight that may lead to new treatments for baldness

 

The researchers identified stem cells within the skin's fatty layer and showed that molecular signals from these cells were necessary to spur hair growth in mice, according to research published in the Sept. 2 issue of the journal Cell.

"If we can get these fat cells in the skin to talk to the dormant stem cells at the base of hair follicles, we might be able to get hair to grow again," said Valerie Horsley, assistant professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology and senior author of the paper.

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How Key Genes Cooperate to Make Healthy Skin

Scientists from Berkeley Lab, the University of Bradford, and Boston University discover a crucial connection in skin formation

 

Skin is the body’s armor, protecting us from disease agents, injury, excessive water loss, and cold and heat. Yet mutations in a single gene, the gene for the protein p63, cause numerous diseases and malformations of the uppermost layer of skin – the epidermis – and other tissues. In the epidermis, these range from skin cancers to dysplasias that cause cracking, bleeding, infection, and discoloration.

A research team from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and spearheaded by colleagues from the University of Bradford in the United Kingdom, including members from Boston University, has learned that p63 acts by directly regulating another protein, Satb1, which is a “genome organizer” – it controls gene expression in progenitor cells by temporarily remodeling chromatin, the structure that makes up the chromosomes and contains tightly wound DNA.

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American Academy of Dermatology Issues New Guidelines of Care for Treatment of Melanoma

Updated evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of melanoma

 

Based on an extensive review of scientific literature and the recommendations of recognized melanoma experts, the American Academy of Dermatology (Academy) has released updated evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Academy’s new guidelines of care for primary cutaneous melanoma focus on biopsy techniques, pathology, surgical treatment, (including sentinel the use of lymph node biopsy), and long-term follow-up care.

“Melanoma is a serious public health issue, as the number of cases has been increasing at an alarming rate — especially among younger people,” said dermatologist Ronald L. Moy, MD, FAAD, president of the Academy. “There are many factors that must be considered when diagnosing and treating melanoma, and these new guidelines offer physicians clinically sound recommendations on how to treat melanoma patients and potentially increase their chance of survival from this deadly disease.”

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