Log in
A+ A A-

Fall Sports: Staying Active While Being Safe for the Season

Orthopaedic surgeons share tips to help athletes stay clear of sports injuries this fall

 

Summer is coming to an end, and it won’t be long before athletes and sports enthusiasts take to the field to play soccer, football, volleyball or some other fall sport.

Staying active is ideal for building strong bones and weight-bearing activities such as running and playing sports helps to achieve that. That is why the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons(AAOS), the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM)and the STOP Sports Injuries campaign is urging everyone to stay active, but to keep safety first when engaging in these activities.

(0 votes)

Recurring Shoulder Instability Injuries Likely Among Young Athletes Playing Contact Sports

How to Minimize the Chances of Shoulder Injuries

 

Summer is a peak season for many sports, and with that comes sport-related injuries. Among those injuries is shoulder joint dislocation. According to a literature review in the August 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, most incidences of shoulder joint instability are the result of traumatic contact injuries like force or falling on an outstretched arm; a direct blow to the shoulder area; forceful throwing, lifting or hitting; or contact with another player.

By the Numbers

  • In 45 percent of shoulder joint instability injuries, young athletes lost more than 10 days from sport.
  • Young male athletes are at greatest risk of shoulder joint instability injuries and recurrences.
  • In one study, the rate of athletes reinjuring their shoulder was higher in patients younger than 23 years of age (72 percent) than patients older than 30 years of age (27 percent).
  • Young athletes between the ages of 15 to 20 years of age who were treated nonsurgically had an injury recurrence rate of 87 percent.
  • Arthritis of the shoulder occurred in up to 40 percent of athletes with recurring shoulder instability injuries.

In young athletes, traumatic anterior (front) shoulder dislocation injuries have shown high incidences of the sudden tearing of the labrum (the tissue rim surrounding the shoulder socket) and ligaments from the bone of the socket.

(0 votes)

School Sports: Tips to Identify and Treat Concussions

(ARA) - The crunch of pads followed by a tweet of a whistle, the thump of a basketball with a staccato of footfalls to accompany it, and even the thwack of a hockey puck against Plexiglass means one thing: school sports are in season.

Coaches, parents and players are all getting ready for the game and practices are hard and grueling. But many sports involve contact and potential injuries, so coaches and parents need to educate themselves about serious injuries likeconcussions.

At the professional level, more and more attention is being paid to the hard hits players are taking. The NFL is changing rules on helmet-to-helmet contact in hopes of reducing the number and severity of concussions suffered by players. But, head injuries also happen at much lower levels of play, and can be very serious.

(0 votes)
Subscribe to this RSS feed

39°F

New York

Fair

Humidity: 20%

Wind: 7 mph

  • 5 Apr 2016 43°F 29°F
  • 6 Apr 2016 49°F 44°F