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Chemical Found in Plastic May Put Kids at Risk of Kidney and Heart Disease

Bisphenol A, better known as BPA, was recently banned in baby bottles but the FDA stopped short of completely nixing the chemical.

A common chemical found in the lining of water bottles, aluminum cans and other food packaging may put children at risk of developing kidney and heart disease, according to a study from the NYU School of Medicine.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 700 children, focusing on the amount of Bisphenol A, better known as BPA, in their urine.

“The people who have been exposed to high levels of BPA in their urine are showing that they’re also leaking proteins,” said Dr. Matthew Budoff, cardiologist at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. “And when you start leaking proteins from your kidney, you start building kidney damage.”

As the kidney becomes compromised, so do the blood vessels and the heart. That can lead to an increased risk of developing heart disease in the future.

Few Teens Undergo Pregnancy Testing in Emergency Department

teenage-pregnancy

Pregnancy Testing Rates Among Adolescent Emergency Department Patients

 

Few adolescent females undergo pregnancy testing in the hospital emergency department (ED), even when they complain of lower abdominal pain, or before they are exposed to radiation for tests or examinations, according to an abstract presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans.

In the abstract, "Pregnancy Testing Rates Among Adolescent Emergency Department Patients," researchers reviewed National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 2000 to 2009 on female patients aged 14 to 21 who were examined in a hospital ED.

  • Written by American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Category: Child Health
  • Hits: 1600

Study Succeeds in Cutting Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing by Pediatricians

A study involving one of the nation's largest networks of pediatric practices was able to nearly halve the inappropriate use of antibiotics through quarterly monitoring and feedback of the physicians' prescribing patterns.

 

The research, which is being presented at IDWeek, is one of the first to look at an antimicrobial stewardship intervention in the outpatient setting.

Although efforts to cut the overuse of antibiotics have made headway in hospitals, the majority of prescriptions are written by community-based clinicians -- often for pediatric patients with common ailments. "If you really want to impact antibiotic use, you have to do it with outpatient prescribing," said lead researcher Jeffrey Gerber, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Our message is that targeting common conditions and intervening in the outpatient setting is doable."

  • Written by Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America
  • Category: Child Health
  • Hits: 1618

Common Risky Behaviors of Children Struck by Motor Vehicles Outlined

The risky behavior of child pedestrians who are struck by cars

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans highlights the risky behavior of child pedestrians who are struck by cars -- including darting into the street, crossing in the middle of the block, and crossing while using an electronic device.

For the abstract, "Risky Behaviors of Pediatric Pedestrians Who are Struck by Motor Vehicles," researchers collected data on all pedestrians who were injured by a motor vehicle and presented to a Level I trauma center in New York City between 2008 and 2011.

Of the 1,075 patients, 145 (13 percent) were under age 18. When compared with adults, children were more likely to be male (65 percent versus. 53 percent), have head injuries (82 percent versus 73 percent), and discharged without admission (70 percent versus 67 percent).

  • Written by American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Category: Child Health
  • Hits: 1342

Medication use higher among overweight kids

prescription-medications

Overweight children aged 12 to 19 are 59 per cent more likely than normal-weight kids to take prescription medication, according to UAlberta research.


Overweight children are far more likely to take prescription medications than children of a normal weight—a trend that adds to already higher health-care costs for treating childhood obesity, according to new research from the University of Alberta.

Researchers from the School of Public Health analyzed the medication use of more than 2,000 Canadian children through the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey. They found that overweight and obese kids aged 12 to 19 years were 59 per cent more likely than their normal-weight peers to take prescription medication.

Co-author Christina Fung said prescription drug expenditures have doubled over the past decade and now account for 17 per cent of health-care costs in Canada—the second highest after hospital expenses. Having a more complete picture helps governments and health-care providers direct spending more effectively, she said.

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